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BigSteve

How much change in Toe can affect handling?

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I guess this is a question for the track car owners.

I've not long had a 4 wheel alignment and I noticed the car felt different pretty much straight away and I'm sure the cars' predictability has lessened. The only alterations made were to the front and rear toe which have slightly altered the camber (~ 0.05') and caster (+ 0.05'-0.10') according to the alignment report.

What the car feels like now is that turn in is not quite as sharp (like I have to turn the steering wheel a touch further), and on moderate bends (steadily powering round the bend) the back feels like it is oversteering. Also straight line cruise feels a little wandery at the rear as if there is very little air in the rear tyres.

The way it drove prior to the alignment really suited my driving style, so I'm not sure what to do.

Here is my before and after 'Total Toe' settings:

Before

Front -0.22' | Rear 0.10' | Thrust Angle 0.10'

After

Front -0.01' | Rear 0.20' | Thrust Angle 0.00'

My question is... Could the small toe setting changes have caused these symptoms?

I can provide a pic of the alignment report if needed.

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need some advise from sifu here. fren has been asking if performance tires is more fuel saving than other types of tires ? read from newspaper, the tread pattern, rubber and inflation pressure somehow able to save more ptrol and prolong mileage. 

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The typical radial tire consists of six main parts. (Inner Liner, Carcass Ply, Beads, Sidewall, Crown Plies (or belts), Tread)

All of them play a part in the performance of tires. Tread pattern, provides traction and cornering grip for the tire and is designed to resist wear, abrasion and heat. Reinforcing agents in the rubber are used, such as carbon blacks and silica are mixed into the compounds to strengthen the tyre. Every tyre is designed to roll at a given pressure. It is dangerous to allow tire pressure to drop below the specification recommended on the vehicle placard. Low pressure increases the amount of tire wall movement resulting from cornering forces. Furthermore, the tire will absorb more of the irregular forces of normal driving. With this constant bending of the side wall as it absorbs the contours of the road, it heats up the tire wall to possibly dangerous temperatures. Additionally, this flexing degrades the steel wire reinforcement; this often leads to side wall blow-outs.

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I do realised that tires did contributes to 20% of fuel price...so is better that choosing the one can last longer lo.

Besides quality& design of tires, sometime driving skill is also very important...and subject to weather condition and road condition. 

This video will advise you about tire controlling..just have a look

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If you're using good branded tires but you're careless, I think it's no better than the people who use cheap tires but drive carefully lo. IMO, driving skill and manner are more important than quality of tires. Accident will still happen to those who has best tyre in the world if you are an aggressive driver. Don't you think so?

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Been using all kind of tires still find Michelin Pilot Super Sport is still the better choice. I am using it for my Honda city for 2 years plus and the tread still perfectly fine.It give us max comfort level because of the quality. As I know Michelin is having promotion now..see if you keen?

http://www.michelin.com.my/Buying-Guides/Promotions/Spotlight/3.html

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I think you car will not be that stable after changing the alignment! 

 

I guess this is a question for the track car owners.

I've not long had a 4 wheel alignment and I noticed the car felt different pretty much straight away and I'm sure the cars' predictability has lessened. The only alterations made were to the front and rear toe which have slightly altered the camber (~ 0.05') and caster (+ 0.05'-0.10') according to the alignment report.

What the car feels like now is that turn in is not quite as sharp (like I have to turn the steering wheel a touch further), and on moderate bends (steadily powering round the bend) the back feels like it is oversteering. Also straight line cruise feels a little wandery at the rear as if there is very little air in the rear tyres.

The way it drove prior to the alignment really suited my driving style, so I'm not sure what to do.


Here is my before and after 'Total Toe' settings:

Before
Front -0.22' | Rear 0.10' | Thrust Angle 0.10'

After
Front -0.01' | Rear 0.20' | Thrust Angle 0.00'


My question is... Could the small toe setting changes have caused these symptoms?

I can provide a pic of the alignment report if needed.

 

 

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